Beckman Researchers Report on Biomedical Imaging Advances

Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) image of the whole mouse brain microvascular system.  This image represents ˜1cm3 of tissue, requiring less than two days to image and ˜2TB of storage. Cross sections of the whole brain are shown (a-f) along with a close-up of the somatosensory cortex (g) with the lateral ventricles (1) and the Pericallosal artery (2) labeled.  A 5123 data volume of the network is shown with color representing capillary diameter (h-i).  Analysis of data at this scale will require high-performance computation combined with new algorithms for segmentation and analysis.
Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM) image of the whole mouse brain microvascular system. This image represents ˜1cm3 of tissue, requiring less than two days to image and ˜2TB of storage. Cross sections of the whole brain are shown (a-f) along with a close-up of the somatosensory cortex (g) with the lateral ventricles (1) and the Pericallosal artery (2) labeled. A 5123 data volume of the network is shown with color representing capillary diameter (h-i). Analysis of data at this scale will require high-performance computation combined with new algorithms for segmentation and analysis.

Beckman Institute researchers Gabriel Popescu and David Mayerich report in separate papers in the current issue of Biomedical Optics Express on research that has implications for detecting and understanding diseases like cancer and sickle cell anemia.

Beckman Institute researchers Gabriel Popescu and David Mayerich report in separate papers in the current issue of Biomedical Optics Express on research that has implications for detecting and understanding diseases like cancer and sickle cell anemia.

Mayerich, a Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow, is lead author on a paper titled Fast macro-scale transmission imaging of microvascular networks using KESM that reports on a fast new method for mapping blood vessels. The method used a technique called knife-edge scanning microscopy (KESM) to provide a full, three-dimensional image of the structure of a vascular network in a mouse’s brain. To read the paper, click here.

Two papers from Popescu’s Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory at Beckman were published in the current issue. One paper, titled Born approximation model for light scattering by red blood cells, reports on using a light imaging method called Fourier Transform Light Scattering (FTLS) to assess the shape of red blood cells, an important topic since misshapen blood cells are a sign of serious illness. To read the paper, click here. The other paper, Simultaneous optical measurements of cell motility and growth, describes using an imaging method developed in their lab called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) to measure  both cell growth and morphogenesis. To read the paper click here.   

Biomedical Optics Express is the journal of The Optical Society.