Event details

Event details

Event Series: Frontiers in Miniature Brain Machinery

Frontiers in Miniature Brain Machinery: Todd Coleman

2269 Beckman Institute

Contact name: Anne McKinney
Contact email: amckinn@illinois.edu

Todd Coleman, Associate Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University, will lecture on “Monitoring and modulating nervous systems in the brain and visceral organs” at 4:00 pm in 2269 Beckman Institute and on Zoom September 28, 2022.  One of our MBM trainees will give an introduction.

The lecture is free and open to the public courtesy of the Miniature Brain Machinery Program. Zoom details are below.

Abstract:

We will highlight recent technological and methodological advances in deploying miniaturized technologies that can monitor the electrophysiologic patterns of the visceral nervous system.  Specifically, we will showcase recent developments in biomedical signal processing that enable non-invasive tracking of the slow wave patterns associated with the neuromuscular activity of the stomach.

We will also describe recent developments of thin, stretchable, wireless biosensor patches that can be embedded within routinely used medical adhesives for ambulatory recording of these gastric electrophysiologic patterns.  We will illustrate how such systems can also be used in tandem with novel miniaturized pacing devices to enable closed-loop neuromodulation of the enteric nervous system.

We will also discuss recent efforts in exploring the electrophysiologic basis of the gut-brain axis with concurrent non-invasive electrophysiologic recordings of the brain and stomach. We will conclude with a summary of the knowns and unknowns in how multi-organ physiology research, technology miniaturization, and data science may create unique opportunities for the intersection of engineering, applied probability, neuroscience, and medicine.

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Frontiers in Miniature Brain Machinery: Hee Jung Chung

2269 Beckman Institute

Contact name: Anne McKinney
Contact email: amckinn@illinois.edu

Hee Jung Chung, Associate Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience at Illinois, will lecture on “The role of brain specific tyrosine phosphatase STEP in hippocampal excitability and seizures” at 4:00 pm in 2269 Beckman Institute and on Zoom October 5, 2022.  One of our MBM trainees will give an introduction.

The lecture is free and open to the public courtesy of the Miniature Brain Machinery Program. Zoom details are below.

Hee Jung Chung completed her PhD at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as well as a postdoctoral appointment at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research interests focus on neurological and behavioral disorders with an emphasis on the study of epilepsy.

The Chung Lab endeavors to understand how epilepsy mutations affect ion channel function and lead to hyperexcitability in inherited or de novo epilepsy, and identify molecular mechanisms that alter ion channels to cause hyperexcitability in acquired epilepsy. To investigate these two areas, they use interdisciplinary approaches including primary neuronal culture, live and fixed microscopy, biochemistry, electrophysiology, and mouse genetics.

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Frontiers in Miniature Brain Machinery: Sepideh Sadaghiani

2269 Beckman Institute

Contact name: Anne McKinney
Contact email: amckinn@illinois.edu

Sepideh Sadaghiani, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Illinois, will lecture on “The functional connectome across temporal scales” at 4:00 pm in 2269 Beckman Institute and on Zoom October 26, 2022.  One of our MBM trainees will give an introduction.

The lecture is free and open to the public courtesy of the Miniature Brain Machinery Program. Zoom details are below.

Abstract:

The view of human brain function has drastically shifted over the last decade, owing to the observation that most brain activity is intrinsic rather than driven by external stimuli or cognitive demands. Specifically, all brain regions continuously communicate in spatiotemporally organized patterns that constitute the functional connectome, with consequences for cognition and behavior.

In this talk, I will argue that another shift is underway, driven by new insights from synergistic interrogation of the functional connectome using different acquisition methods. The human functional connectome is typically investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that relies on the indirect hemodynamic signal, thereby emphasizing very slow connectivity across brain regions. Conversely, more recent methodological advances demonstrate that fast connectivity within the whole-brain connectome can be studied with real-time methods such as electroencephalography (EEG).

Our findings show that combining fMRI with scalp or intracranial EEG in humans, especially when recorded concurrently, paints a multiplex picture of neural communication across the connectome. Specifically, the connectome comprises both fast, oscillation-based connectivity observable with EEG, as well as extremely slow processes best captured by fMRI. While the fast and slow processes share an important degree of spatial organization, these processes unfold in a temporally independent manner.

Our observations suggest that infraslow connectivity (measured in fMRI) and rapid connectivity of various frequency bands (measured by EEG) constitute multiple dynamic trajectories through a shared state space of discrete connectome configurations. The multitude of flexible trajectories may enable any given brain region to 

concurrently

 connect to multiple sets of other regions.

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Frontiers in Miniature Brain Machinery: Aadeel Akhtar

2269 Beckman Institute

Contact name: Anne McKinney
Contact email: amckinn@illinois.edu

Aadeel Akhtar, CEO and Founder of PSYONIC, will lecture on “PSYONIC – Advances in Commercial Sensorimotor Bionic Limbs” November 9 at 4:00 pm in 2269 Beckman Institute and on Zoom. Shannon Berneche, MBM trainee and PhD candidate in Neuroscience, will give an introduction.

The lecture is free and open to the public courtesy of the Miniature Brain Machinery Program.

Abstract:

Commercially available bionic limbs have been far behind the state-of-the-art research that has been developed at academic institutions around the world. PSYONIC’s Ability Hand was developed to take advances in soft robotics and sensorimotor prostheses and make them available and accessible to people with upper limb amputations in the US and abroad. The Ability Hand is a multiarticulated bionic hand that is the fastest on the market, robust to impacts, and gives users touch feedback. It is also covered by Medicare in the US. This talk will detail the development of the Ability Hand, its current capabilities, and further advancements in bionic limbs that will be coming in the near future.

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