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UIUC, Carle partner to launch brain study

Thanks to a collaboration between Carle and the University of Illinois, the first-of-its-kind Champaign-Urbana Population Study will be conducted to collect information about the brain’s structure and function across a diverse group of volunteers.
Published on Dec. 3, 2021

Thanks to a collaboration between Carle and the University of Illinois, a first-of-its-kind imaging study will be conducted in Champaign-Urbana.

The Siemens Healthineers MAGNETOM Terra 7 Tesla MRI scanner located at the Carle Illinois Advanced Imaging Center. The Siemens MAGNETOM Terra 7 Tesla MRI is housed at the Carle Illinois Advanced Imaging Center at Carle Health. The Champaign-Urbana Population Study will use the new, jointly acquired unique technology, the Siemens MAGNETOM Terra 7 Tesla MRI, to collect information about the brain’s structure and function across a diverse group of volunteers.

Leaders of the study anticipate the information collected will improve our understanding of brain health and how the brain changes over time. Hopes are the study will support the translation of technology to improve clinical outcomes.

To move forward, the study needs 300 local volunteers ages 18 and older to participate. Participation includes an up-to-three-year commitment, and volunteers will also complete several questionnaires about their health, medical history, and physical activity. They will also participate in a brief cognitive function assessment and have up to three, 2-hour brain scans at the Carle Illinois Advanced Imaging Center.

Bruce Damon. “We are very excited to be conducting this study with those who live in or near the Champaign-Urbana area. Those who participate will be able to say they contributed to research making a difference in so many lives locally, nationally and internationally,” said Bruce Damon, co-director of the Carle Illinois Advanced Imaging Center and director of Clinical Imaging Research for the Stephens Family Clinical Research Institute at Carle Health.

Data collected from volunteers will be available for local researchers from Carle and the university and create a de-identified public database of 7 Tesla neuroimaging as a baseline for future studies around the world. The neuroimaging data will provide unique and detailed information about the structure and function of the brains of healthy volunteers.

Tracey Wszalek is the director of the Biomedical Imaging Center at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.Tracey Wszalek.“With the collaboration between researchers and clinicians that already exists between the university and Carle, it made the most sense to do a study together. This is huge because no one in the state of Illinois has this kind of access to the 7T – an incredibly safe tool that provides incredibly detailed images,” said Tracey Wszalek, the co-director of the Carle Illinois Advanced Imaging Center.

Wszalek is also the director of the Biomedical Imaging Center at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois.

Study sponsors are Carle Foundation Hospital, Stephens Family Clinical Research Institute, the University of Illinois, and the Beckman Institute.


Editor's Note:

This article is adapted from the original story published by Carle Health Public Relations.

To learn more about the team leading the research or to volunteer to be part of this once-in-a-lifetime study, visit the Champaign-Urbana Population Study website.

Contact Carle Public Relations:

Media contact line: (217) 902-5201

publicrelations@carle.com

Contact the Beckman Institute Communications Office:

Meg Dickinson, director of communications: (217) 493-6590 or megd@illinois.edu 

General email address: communications@beckman.illinois.edu 

In this article

  • Bruce Damon
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  • Tracey M. Wszalek
    Tracey M. Wszalek's directory photo.