Morrow Named Co-chair of HCII

Dan Morrow brings many years of experience collaborating on research projects involving psychology and technology to his new position as Co-chair of the Human-Computer Intelligent Interaction (HCII) research theme. Morrow was recently chosen as an HCII co-chair to replace Art Kramer, who was named Beckman Institute Director in May.     

Dan Morrow said his many years of experience collaborating on research projects involving psychology and technology will serve him well in his new position as Co-chair of the Human-Computer Intelligent Interaction (HCII) research theme. Morrow was recently chosen as an HCII co-chair to replace Art Kramer, who was named Beckman Institute Director in May.     

“I want to thank Dan Morrow for giving his time in order to serve the Beckman Institute as a co-chair of the Human-Computer Intelligent Interaction research theme,” Kramer said. “Dan is widely known not only for his research into human factors and cognitive aging – two areas that are key HCII research efforts – but also for his ability to work successfully with others. Dan is a superb choice as Co-chair for HCII.”

Morrow, a member of HCII’s Human Perception and Performance group, will serve as Co-chair with Tom Huang.

“It’s an honor to be asked to serve with Tom Huang as co-chairs of HCII and to work with the many world class scientists in our group,” Morrow said.

Morrow, whose research focuses on topics such as cognitive aging and human factors related to communication in complex tasks such as in aviation, said he will use his experiences as a researcher to enhance future work in HCII.    

“I hope to build on the strong history of interdisciplinary research at Beckman,” Morrow said. “My background is in human factors and psychology, which focuses on intersections between technology and human performance. This perspective may help foster interactions between HCII behavioral scientists and researchers focused more on design and engineering.

“For example, many HCII researchers investigate learning, decision making, and other cognitive processes in the context of complex real world activities, from behavioral, computational, or design perspectives. I hope to promote interdisciplinary research across these perspectives on problems in important domains such as health.”